Review: Siren – Annemarie Neary

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I would first like to thank NetGalley, the author and the publisher for granting my request to download and read this book, in exchange for an honest review of this book.

Róisín Burns was a normal teenage girl, until one night she decides to go to a club with her friend, unaware that her friend, isn’t just there to dance and have a laugh. Róisín witnesses horrible things that’s she never wants to see again, but unlucky for her, she hasn’t got a choice in the matter. Now Róisín Burns has had the last twenty years of her life stolen away from her, becoming somebody else and living in New York, away from her family in Ireland. Now the man who started all of this, forcing her and stealing her life from her, flashes up on the news, Brian Lonergan, reinvented himself as a rising politician in Ireland. Wanting her life back and wanting answers and justice, armed with the evidence that could ruin Lonergan, Róisín travels to the island of Lamb to hunt him down. But is Lonergan one step ahead of her?

I requested this book from NetGalley because the description sounded amazing and I couldn’t wait to read it. Once I started reading this book I couldn’t put it down, I made it through the beginning with no problem and I was loving it, but then they did something which is always off putting to me, they jumped back in time. The first hundred pages or so are about how Róisín is on the island, and we discover the mystery behind her character, as we learn she’s there for a purpose, without giving away too many spoilers. So now we have mystery and questions.

Then the book does a jump! This is when my reading slowed down, but I honestly don’t know why. This is the chunk where the questions I had about why she was there on the island, what had happened to counter so much rage and anger in her past to connect the two characters was answers. This section was so jam packed with action and information and there wasn’t that much time for a dull moment for me to slow my reading down, but I did. I think it was because I don’t like it when the time line is presented this way and it knocked me a bit. I had to now get used to a whole new set of characters, a new age main character, a new setting, plus I knew that no matter what happened and how dangerous things got, I knew that Róisín wasn’t going to die and certain events from the future. This then made this section drag on for me until it got to the present day.

It get back to the present day and my reading speed did pick back up again, as everything from there on out was a surprise and any of the current characters could die or anything else. But since reading the past and now reading the present, I was confusing characters with different characters, which is why I hate books with jumbled up time lines. The ending is also left open for you to decide how you think it would end, which again isn’t for me. I like an ending to be wrapped up neatly with a bow and cherry on on top. Unless of course, the author left the ending open because she is planning to write a sequel to this novel.

While reading this book, I found myself not being able to trust any of the characters and I was questioning myself whether or not they were really trying to help poor Róisín or whether they were just working for Lonergan. This made the book and the writing even more amazing as I was actually able to put myself into Róisín shoes and wonder what would I do or feel like if I was on an Island where I couldn’t trust a single person, so fantastic character developments.

I was disappointed when it came to a character name Boyle, which is the other point of view narrative we got to see in the book. Being the other point of view, I was expecting there to be something big or surprising in the end, as there had been a build up to something and even though there had been something he had done (which I’m not going to spoil) he never got true credit for it and was still left unseen to everyone. I finished reading this book feeling sorry for him as all he wanted to do was to be seen or be felt like a hero but not have the confidence, but all he got seen as was a creep and a weirdo, so with everything,  I thought the book was building up to something, but he was still left unseen in the shadows for his actions.

Thiw book kept me reading until the very end because i had to know what Róisín was going to do and whether it was going to work, or if Lonergan was going to stop her. loved the beginning of this book completely and everything is there, but I just am not a fan of this type of time line presentation, but that’s not saying that other people won’t enjoy it. So I am giving this book 3 out of 5 stars.

Let me know what you think. Do you agree or disagree? Comment below 😀

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